“Meditation” has a double etymological origin, Latin and Greek, with two very specific meanings: to cure (from which “to medicate, medicine”) and to think (from which “mind”).
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While my work as a Voicefulness coach is based on the pre-verbal, which is the sound before being linguistically organized in the form of words, I find it extremely important to research the history of the words we use, because we might find incredibly rich and useful nuances to nourish our inner vocabulary, besides the linguistic one.⁣⁣
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Think about how many times we listen to a speech, a phrase that has a precise meaning, but we get completely different sensations if not even opposed to the verbal sense of those words.
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We can also use words and sentences themselves to meditate (mantra) and it is important to know their meaning; however even the sound of an unknown language can be extremely powerful.
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There is this story of a very old, illiterate Italian gentleman who went to Mass when it was still celebrated in Latin. Obviously, he didn’t know the language, so he didn’t understand the meaning of the words.
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When the Mass was passed in Italian, the gentleman wanted to confide in the priest and told him: “Excuse me, but I didn’t understand anything.”
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The sound, the signifier, can be much more powerful than the meaning and touches parts that we did not even remember having and suddenly remember that they have always been there.
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Leave a 🙏 in the comments if you know what (I don’t) talk about! ⁣